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Posted: Tuesday March 23, 2010
Ralph Maud

Ralph Maud (1928–2014), a world-renowned expert on the work of Dylan Thomas, Charles Olson, and the ethnographers of the Pacific Northwest, was professor emeritus at Simon Fraser University and founder of the Charles Olson Literary Society. He was the author of Charles Olson Reading (1996), the editor of The Selected Letters of Charles Olson (2000), Poet to Publisher: Charles Olson’s Correspondence with Donald Allen (2003), Charles Olson at the Harbor (2008), and Muthologos: Lectures and Interviews (2010), and the co-editor of After Completion: The Later Letters of Charles Olson and Frances Boldereff (2014). He edited much of Dylan Thomas’s work, including The Notebook Poems 1930–1934 and The Broadcasts, and was co-editor, with Walford Davies, of Dylan Thomas: The Collected Poems, 1934–1953 and Under Milk Wood. Maud was also the editor of The Salish People: Volumes I, II, III & IV by pioneer ethnographer Charles Hill-Tout. He was a contributing editor to Coast Salish Essays by Wayne Suttles and The Chilliwacks and Their Neighbours by Oliver Wells, and authored A Guide to B.C. Indian Myth and Legend and The Porcupine Hunter and Other Stories — a collection of Henry W. Tate’s stories in Tate’s original English, which grew out of his survey of Franz Boas’s Tsimshian work, published as an article: “The Henry Tate-Franz Boas Collaboration on Tsimshian Mythology” in American Ethnologist. Maud’s subsequently published book, Transmission Difficulties: Franz Boas and Tsimshian Mythology, expands further on the relationship between Henry Tate and Franz Boas.



LATEST Ralph Maud NEWS

June 2016 : A new home for Ralph Maud’s Charles Olson library

December 2014 : RALPH MAUD 1928 – 2014

May 2014 : After Completion Has Arrived!

April 2014 : Coming in May! After Completion: The Later Letters of Charles Olson and Frances Boldereff

QUOTES OF NOTE

Charles Olson at the Harbor

“Olson asked him to ‘be his scholar’ (basically, an invited observer) at the 1965 Berkeley Poetry Conference. It was Maud’s destiny to become Olson’s scholar in truth.”
Pacific Rim Review of Books

QUOTES OF NOTE

A Guide to BC Indian Myth and Legend

Important not for what it might tell us about Indian culture in the past, but for what these myths may tell us about our society. This book goes some way toward that goal.
Vancouver Sun

QUOTES OF NOTE

Muthologos

"Maud depicts [Olson] functioning remarkably as a public poet, a poet thinking on his feet, and being absolutely delightful."
Pacific Rim Review of Books

"This new edition of Muthologos reiterates the intensity of attention that Olson brought to his final six years in the public performance of his immense poetic archaeology. These talks and interviews document the processual nature and intellectual hunger that situate his poetic imagination not only in the poem but in the range of perception that can be talked about "with some life." When I heard him talk about his poem "Place; & Names" at UBC in 1963, the poem as discourse for place and history provided a crucial tap for my own sense of poetry’s possibility. His Beloit lectures on "The Dogmatic Nature of Experience" in 1968 coalesce and amplify his most singular pedagogy, "Projective Verse," as the cultural shape shifter it has been. By re-inserting, and supplementing, the tape-recorded era of Olson’s poetic life, Ralph Maud continues to sustain this material as consequential and amazing."
— Fred Wah

QUOTES OF NOTE

Poet to Publisher

The letters make fascinating reading for their commentary on writers…and literary issues from 1957 to 1969…
Canadian LIterature

“More than forty years after its first publication, Donald Allen’s The New American Poetry, 1945–1960 continues actively in print. Here is Allen’s collected correspondence with the master poet Charles Olson, which so shaped and defined that initiating work. Together, they undertook to change the formal disposition of poetry and so brought forward those then unknowns, who were to ‘make it new’ for American poets in all the years since.”
— Robert Creeley

QUOTES OF NOTE

The Porcupine Hunter and Other Stories

Maud acts as restorer, stripping away attitudes and prosody to reveal the vitality of the original text.
Vancouver Sun

QUOTES OF NOTE

The Salish People: Volume IV

“The ethnographic work of Charles Hill-Tout has long been familiar to specialists with access to libraries whose holdings included the professional journals and reports in which his work appeared. Now the wider public has easy access. It is ironic but, for Hill-Tout, consistent twist of fate that some thirty years after death he stands to be more widely read than ever he was in his prime. … In this writing and in his demand as a lecturer, Hill-Tout deserves to be remembered as a popularizer and interpreter of academic subjects for the public. All these achievements were realized with only the slimmest kind of assistance from public sources or funds for research, enough merely to defray a portion of his research expenses. Still more remarkable and in stark contrast with what we have come to accept as the norm for conditions of scholarly work, Hill-Tout never enjoyed the prestige or security of a university or college appointment. In preparing this edition Ralph Maud has done us all a service in making Hill-Tout’s writing available and in providing additional belated recognition for a deserving pioneer British Columbia scholar and educator.”
BC Studies, 1981

QUOTES OF NOTE

The Salish People: Volume III

“The ethnographic work of Charles Hill-Tout has long been familiar to specialists with access to libraries whose holdings included the professional journals and reports in which his work appeared. Now the wider public has easy access. It is ironic but, for Hill-Tout, consistent twist of fate that some thirty years after death he stands to be more widely read than ever he was in his prime. … In this writing and in his demand as a lecturer, Hill-Tout deserves to be remembered as a popularizer and interpreter of academic subjects for the public. All these achievements were realized with only the slimmest kind of assistance from public sources or funds for research, enough merely to defray a portion of his research expenses. Still more remarkable and in stark contrast with what we have come to accept as the norm for conditions of scholarly work, Hill-Tout never enjoyed the prestige or security of a university or college appointment. In preparing this edition Ralph Maud has done us all a service in making Hill-Tout’s writing available and in providing additional belated recognition for a deserving pioneer British Columbia scholar and educator.”
BC Studies, 1981

QUOTES OF NOTE

The Salish People: Volume II

“The ethnographic work of Charles Hill-Tout has long been familiar to specialists with access to libraries whose holdings included the professional journals and reports in which his work appeared. Now the wider public has easy access. It is ironic but, for Hill-Tout, consistent twist of fate that some thirty years after death he stands to be more widely read than ever he was in his prime. … In this writing and in his demand as a lecturer, Hill-Tout deserves to be remembered as a popularizer and interpreter of academic subjects for the public. All these achievements were realized with only the slimmest kind of assistance from public sources or funds for research, enough merely to defray a portion of his research expenses. Still more remarkable and in stark contrast with what we have come to accept as the norm for conditions of scholarly work, Hill-Tout never enjoyed the prestige or security of a university or college appointment. In preparing this edition Ralph Maud has done us all a service in making Hill-Tout’s writing available and in providing additional belated recognition for a deserving pioneer British Columbia scholar and educator.”
BC Studies, 1981

QUOTES OF NOTE

The Salish People: Volume I

“The ethnographic work of Charles Hill-Tout has long been familiar to specialists with access to libraries whose holdings included the professional journals and reports in which his work appeared. Now the wider public has easy access. It is ironic but, for Hill-Tout, consistent twist of fate that some thirty years after death he stands to be more widely read than ever he was in his prime. … In this writing and in his demand as a lecturer, Hill-Tout deserves to be remembered as a popularizer and interpreter of academic subjects for the public. All these achievements were realized with only the slimmest kind of assistance from public sources or funds for research, enough merely to defray a portion of his research expenses. Still more remarkable and in stark contrast with what we have come to accept as the norm for conditions of scholarly work, Hill-Tout never enjoyed the prestige or security of a university or college appointment. In preparing this edition Ralph Maud has done us all a service in making Hill-Tout’s writing available and in providing additional belated recognition for a deserving pioneer British Columbia scholar and educator.”
BC Studies, 1981

QUOTES OF NOTE

After Completion

“Lovers to the end, Olson and Boldereff remained faithfully bonded by the central role that imagination and art played in each of their lives. Their mutual admiration for each other’s intellect was left untarnished by any personal failure. In this volume of letters, it is Boldereff who appears the stronger of the two on all accounts. She never wavers in her interest in Olson as both a man and an artist. … If there’s any benefit to come from having this correspondence made available, it should surely bring about greater attention to the sharp interrelating of Joyce and Blake accomplished by Boldereff in her books. Her work receives too little the acknowledgement it richly deserves.”
Bookslut

“Boldereff, while appearing to serve her pantheon of ‘great men,’ puts them into her service. This book is not the fiery Olson workshop of the previous volume. Boldereff here enters the period of her own working, beginning with her manifesto Credo in Unam … it is a call for a new woman, a woman who is strong, independent, sexually liberated, and within whose ambit man can find his own maturity, as they enter the new age together … Boldereff’s books are strange but not delirious. Her work on Joyce is substantial … ”
The Capilano Review

“What is stunning about this collection is the density of intellectual and cultural observations by both participants in this dialogue – and the ways in which Boldereff and Olson’s mythopoetic shoptalk quickly shifted in and out of the amorous and plainly erotic, which here so often serve as the groundwork of the intellectual and cultural materials.”
— Andrew Mossin


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