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Posted: Tuesday March 23, 2010
Charles Hill-Tout

Born in England and educated at Oxford University, Charles Hill-Tout was a pioneer settler at Abbotsford in the Fraser Valley, 70 kilometers east of Vancouver. He devoted many years to ethnographic and anthropological field work among the Salish people of the west coast recording their customs, stories and art. His scholarly articles were published in the periodicals of the day and he also spent time popularizing the stories and information he amassed in a way that only a local resident ethnographer could do. He was at one time president of the Anthropological section of The Royal Society of Canada and was a fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Britain. The Salish People is a four volume collection of all the field work done by Charles Hill-Tout in the period 1895-1911, divided by specific geographical and cultural areas: The Salish People Volume I: The Thompson and the Okanagan, The Salish People Volume II: The Squamish and the Lillooet, The Salish People Volume III: The Mainland Halkomelem, The Salish People Volume IV: The Sechelt and the South Eastern Tribes of Vancouver Island.



LATEST Charles Hill-Tout NEWS

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QUOTES OF NOTE

The Salish People: Volume IV

“The ethnographic work of Charles Hill-Tout has long been familiar to specialists with access to libraries whose holdings included the professional journals and reports in which his work appeared. Now the wider public has easy access. It is ironic but, for Hill-Tout, consistent twist of fate that some thirty years after death he stands to be more widely read than ever he was in his prime. … In this writing and in his demand as a lecturer, Hill-Tout deserves to be remembered as a popularizer and interpreter of academic subjects for the public. All these achievements were realized with only the slimmest kind of assistance from public sources or funds for research, enough merely to defray a portion of his research expenses. Still more remarkable and in stark contrast with what we have come to accept as the norm for conditions of scholarly work, Hill-Tout never enjoyed the prestige or security of a university or college appointment. In preparing this edition Ralph Maud has done us all a service in making Hill-Tout’s writing available and in providing additional belated recognition for a deserving pioneer British Columbia scholar and educator.”
BC Studies, 1981

QUOTES OF NOTE

The Salish People: Volume III

“The ethnographic work of Charles Hill-Tout has long been familiar to specialists with access to libraries whose holdings included the professional journals and reports in which his work appeared. Now the wider public has easy access. It is ironic but, for Hill-Tout, consistent twist of fate that some thirty years after death he stands to be more widely read than ever he was in his prime. … In this writing and in his demand as a lecturer, Hill-Tout deserves to be remembered as a popularizer and interpreter of academic subjects for the public. All these achievements were realized with only the slimmest kind of assistance from public sources or funds for research, enough merely to defray a portion of his research expenses. Still more remarkable and in stark contrast with what we have come to accept as the norm for conditions of scholarly work, Hill-Tout never enjoyed the prestige or security of a university or college appointment. In preparing this edition Ralph Maud has done us all a service in making Hill-Tout’s writing available and in providing additional belated recognition for a deserving pioneer British Columbia scholar and educator.”
BC Studies, 1981

QUOTES OF NOTE

The Salish People: Volume II

“The ethnographic work of Charles Hill-Tout has long been familiar to specialists with access to libraries whose holdings included the professional journals and reports in which his work appeared. Now the wider public has easy access. It is ironic but, for Hill-Tout, consistent twist of fate that some thirty years after death he stands to be more widely read than ever he was in his prime. … In this writing and in his demand as a lecturer, Hill-Tout deserves to be remembered as a popularizer and interpreter of academic subjects for the public. All these achievements were realized with only the slimmest kind of assistance from public sources or funds for research, enough merely to defray a portion of his research expenses. Still more remarkable and in stark contrast with what we have come to accept as the norm for conditions of scholarly work, Hill-Tout never enjoyed the prestige or security of a university or college appointment. In preparing this edition Ralph Maud has done us all a service in making Hill-Tout’s writing available and in providing additional belated recognition for a deserving pioneer British Columbia scholar and educator.”
BC Studies, 1981

QUOTES OF NOTE

The Salish People: Volume I

“The ethnographic work of Charles Hill-Tout has long been familiar to specialists with access to libraries whose holdings included the professional journals and reports in which his work appeared. Now the wider public has easy access. It is ironic but, for Hill-Tout, consistent twist of fate that some thirty years after death he stands to be more widely read than ever he was in his prime. … In this writing and in his demand as a lecturer, Hill-Tout deserves to be remembered as a popularizer and interpreter of academic subjects for the public. All these achievements were realized with only the slimmest kind of assistance from public sources or funds for research, enough merely to defray a portion of his research expenses. Still more remarkable and in stark contrast with what we have come to accept as the norm for conditions of scholarly work, Hill-Tout never enjoyed the prestige or security of a university or college appointment. In preparing this edition Ralph Maud has done us all a service in making Hill-Tout’s writing available and in providing additional belated recognition for a deserving pioneer British Columbia scholar and educator.”
BC Studies, 1981


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